Browse Prior Art Database

Vacuum Fluorescent Display Icon

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117874D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fowler, RG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

There exists today many types of displays that may attach to Point-of-Sale terminals. The displays are connected via cables into a port connector somewhere on the terminal. The ports are designated in some way to help the user pick the correct one for attachment. As most terminals must be National Language Support (words on the labels must be translated, meaning higher cost for more labels), symbols are used. Although there are internationally recognized standard symbols for video displays (CRTs), there are no such standards for customer displays such as 2x20 segmented Vacuum Fluorescent Displays (VFDs). Additionally, the standard symbols available usually pertain to the PC industry more than Point-of-Sale.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

Vacuum Fluorescent Display Icon

      There exists today many types of displays that may attach to
Point-of-Sale terminals.  The displays are connected via cables into
a port connector somewhere on the terminal.  The ports are designated
in some way to help the user pick the correct one for attachment.  As
most terminals must be National Language Support (words on the labels
must be translated, meaning higher cost for more labels), symbols are
used.  Although there are internationally recognized standard symbols
for video displays (CRTs), there are no such standards for customer
displays such as 2x20 segmented Vacuum Fluorescent Displays (VFDs).
Additionally, the standard symbols available usually pertain to the
PC industry more than Point-of-Sale.

      Disclosed is a new icon that was created showing a simplified
graphical representation of the current Point-of-Sale customer
displays.  This is done in much the same way that the video displays
are represented by their simplified graphic.  The new icon located
above the connector helps the user gain immediate correlation and
recognition of what Point-of-Sale device plugs into that port.  This
icon can also be used in a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to help the
operator with on screen instructions or in a book for the same
purpose -- all with no additional translation costs.  The more
intuitive the icon, the better, as some of the potential users will
be untrained (Figure).

      Similar problems for v...