Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard Support for Graphical User Interface Designer to Cursor within a Selected Group of Controls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117907D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lewsey, DA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a scheme that provides an intuitive means of specifying which part is cursored using the keyboard, and provides visual cues to distinguish between the different selection states. Using this scheme it was possible to provide keyboard support in addition to the mouse support.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Keyboard Support for Graphical User Interface Designer to Cursor
within a Selected Group of Controls

      Disclosed is a scheme that provides an intuitive means of
specifying which part is cursored using the keyboard, and provides
visual cues to distinguish between the different selection states.
Using this scheme it was possible to provide keyboard support in
addition to the mouse support.

      In a Graphical User Interface (GUI) designer, it is generally
possible to select more than one control at a time and then perform
actions on the selected controls as a group.  Actions can be moving,
duplicating deleting, etc..  Some actions that could be performed
require that one of the selected controls be used as a reference, or
"anchor".  Such actions include alignment, spacing and sizing.  It
may also be the case that the user would want to perform an action on
a non-selected control without changing the selection state of the
other controls.  If a mouse is used, this can be accomplished by
showing a popup when the user button-2 clicks on a given control.  In
such a case, the control for which the menu was shown would be the
anchor, and any selection made from the menu would use that anchor as
a reference if required.  Displaying the popup would not alter the
selection status of any of the controls.  The difficulty arises when
keyboard support is provided, or a non-context sensitive menu (i.e.,
a menubar) is used to select the action to be taken.  In both these
cases, a means is required which will allow the user to indicate
which control should be the recipient or focus of the action, without
changing any controls' selection status.

      A visual cue is required for indicating when a control is...