Browse Prior Art Database

Source-Independent Virtual Motion Chair

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117925D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Schmitt, SA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of controlling virtual reality motion base, either a chair or platform, without a direct program control interface with the video source.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Source-Independent Virtual Motion Chair

      Disclosed is a method of controlling virtual reality motion
base, either a chair or platform, without a direct program control
interface with the video source.

      Virtual reality motion chairs and platforms simulate motion by
moving or tilting the user in synchronism with a video source.  The
source of the video stream typically generates the control signals
for the motion base.  The video source, whether it is a game or
passive video, has to provide the sound, video, and motion control
information.  These are highly customized data streams and only work
for specific motion bases and have to be hand crafted for each use.

      This invention is a means to generate the control information
for the motion base independent of the source.  This would give the
user a much larger selection of video sources that could be enhanced
with virtual motion.

      There are a large number of video sources including computer
games, broadcast television, VCR tapes, and special first person
perspective video sequences that would benefit from virtual motion.
Without special hand crafting, these video sources cannot be used
with any present motion bases.

      The basic idea of this invention is to use a computer to
analyze the video signal being displayed to the user and extract the
apparent motion to control the motion base.  Moving Pictures Experts
Group (MPEG) compression techniques use motion detection algorithms
to determine the motion of each group of 16 x 16 pixals.  By
analyzing the motion of each small area of the scene, it is possible
to determine how the camera was moving relative to the background
when the scene was recorded.  This motion information can be used to
control the motion base to simulate motion.

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