Browse Prior Art Database

Cloning the Microcode and Settings of an Optical Drive

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117939D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Goodman, BG: AUTHOR

Abstract

Updating microcode in the field or in distribution warehouses can be time consuming and difficult for several drives or more. It requires that each device be connected to a computer interface with a host computer. The host computer must issue a series of commands to the device and then wait for the programming and setup to complete. Microcode Download Through Media Insertion solves the problem of computer interface and host computer, but it creates a new problem with microcode distribution because the optical media is very expensive and special tools must be written to create the media.

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Cloning the Microcode and Settings of an Optical Drive

      Updating microcode in the field or in distribution warehouses
can be time consuming and difficult for several drives or more.  It
requires that each device be connected to a computer interface with a
host computer.  The host computer must issue a series of commands to
the device and then wait for the programming and setup to complete.
Microcode Download Through Media Insertion solves the problem of
computer interface and host computer, but it creates a new problem
with microcode distribution because the optical media is very
expensive and special tools must be written to create the media.

      With this solution, a drive would clone itself in terms of
microcode level and any settings that one may want to transfer to
another drive.  This cloning process would make a copy, of the drive
being cloned, on a piece of optical media that happens to be inside
the drive.  When the cloning media is inserted into any other similar
drive, it causes that drive to replace its microcode and any
settings.  The customer uses his own media and can control how many
pieces of media he uses to complete the programming job.  The
microcode itself has special codes that allow manufacturing to decide
what settings can be shared between drives.

      This solution eliminates the distribution and cost for sending
optical media to each customer that may want to update an inventory
of drives.  The customer can easily prod...