Browse Prior Art Database

Signature or Image Capture Using Bar Code Scanner

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000117962D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 4 page(s) / 155K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cato, RT: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a means for capturing a signature or two dimensional image with a traditional bar code scanner, not a two dimensional scanner.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 39% of the total text.

Signature or Image Capture Using Bar Code Scanner

      Disclosed is a means for capturing a signature or two
dimensional image with a traditional bar code scanner, not a two
dimensional scanner.

      A special bar code is placed on both sides of the signature
area of the document to be signed.  The bar codes utilizes wedge
shaped bars and spaces to establish the X-Y coordinates of where the
laser spot is scanning.  The digital value of the scanner's data
output (湖鲓white) combined with a calculated X-Y coordinate
establishes one of many "pixels" scanned by a single laser scan line.
Similar to the way a TV image is created by composite raster of many
scans of the CRT's electron beam, the laser beam would be manually
moved to create a raster of scan lines across the image to be
captured.

      Wedge bars could be printed on the receipt tape the customer
signs.  For a hand held device such as Aruba, the operator could
carry a small pad of preprinted signature sheets that have the wedge
bars printed on them.  Another method would have the wedge bars
printed on the top of the wrap stand and the operator would place a
signed piece of plain paper between the wedge bars before scanning.
The operator would then press a button to place the system in
signature capture mode and proceed to scan the signature.

      For the purpose of this discussion, the X axis will be in the
direction parallel to the line on which the signature is to be signed
on.  The origin of the X axis can be placed anywhere on the X axis,
but it is more convenient if it is near where the signature is
expected to start.  The Y direction is perpendicular to the X
direction.

      Bar code scanners normally only measure relative distances in X
direction.

      The bars and spaces of a normal bar code are the same width
along their entire height.  A scan line can cross the bars and spaces
anywhere and correctly decode the label.  This makes it easier for
the operator to successfully hit the bar code with the scan line.
The X coordinate of the laser spot is established on a relative basis
by looking for recognizable characteristics within the bar code.
Once the bar code characteristics are recognized in the scan line
data, a X axis origin can be arbitrarily assigned to the data.
Calculations based on the relative X coordinates of the bar code
characteristics enable the bar code to be decoded.

      The Y coordinate of the laser spot is unknown and doesn't
matter when scanning a normal bar code, as long as the scan line
crosses all of the label.

Tapered or Wedge Shaped Bars Enable Y Coordinate to be Established

      Placing a pair of tapered or wedge shaped bars at each side of
the signature or image to be captured enables a relative Y coordinate
of the laser spot to be established at these places.  See the Figure
provided.  The lower on the wedge bars the laser line crosses, the
wider the wedge bars get and the more narrow the space...