Browse Prior Art Database

Diamond-Like Carbon for Optical Disk Sliders and Tape Guides

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118013D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Winarski, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) is a new coating with the highly desirable tribological properties of hardness, wear resistance, and very low friction. Patents have been issued for Rotating Magnetic Media (RMM) for DLC. There are also improvements to DLC, which include amorphous hydrogenated DLC, nitrogenated DLC, and fluorinated DLC.

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Diamond-Like Carbon for Optical Disk Sliders and Tape Guides

      Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) is a new coating with the highly
desirable tribological properties of hardness, wear resistance, and
very low friction.  Patents have been issued for Rotating Magnetic
Media (RMM) for DLC.  There are also improvements to DLC, which
include amorphous hydrogenated DLC, nitrogenated DLC, and fluorinated
DLC.

      This article improves the application DLC to forms of
storage beyond RMM.  This includes optical disk drives, such as
magneto-optical, write-once, phase-change, CD-ROM, CD-R(ecordable),
or CD-E(rasable).  Also included are guides, hydrodynamic and
hydrostatic air bearings, and other guiding surfaces for flexible
media devices such as magnetic and optical tape drives.

      A tribo-attractive optical slider, such as in (*), could be
coated with any of the above forms of DLC.  The contact recording of
the tribo-attractive slider would benefit from DLC just like the
contact recording of RMM.

      In a tape drive, there are many surfaces exposed to the
abrasive action of the long ribbon of tape from populations of
magnetic tape cartridges or cassettes.  Since the tape from a great
many cartridges or cassettes may pass many times over these surfaces,
much wear can take place.  If such wear does take place, it can
misguide the  tape or cause vibrations in the tape which degrade the
Signal to Noise  Ratio (SNR), either of which degrade the
Input/Output (...