Browse Prior Art Database

Zoom-Scale Using Conventional Scroll Bars

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118024D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-31
Document File: 2 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for utilization of the size of a Graphical User Interface (GUI) window scroll button to feedback to the user how much relative distance of an object in a given direction is shown. Additionally, it provides the ability to zoom in and out by borrowing the well-known window-border re-size interaction.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Zoom-Scale Using Conventional Scroll Bars

      Disclosed is a method for utilization of the size of a
Graphical User Interface (GUI) window scroll button to feedback to
the user how much relative distance of an object in a given direction
is shown.  Additionally, it provides the ability to zoom in and out
by borrowing the well-known window-border re-size interaction.

      Users of GUIs commonly interact with windows that allow
scrolling in the 'x' and 'y' dimensions, but not in the 'z'
dimension.  Altering the view in the 'z' dimension is referred to as
"zooming".  There is currently no intuitive, universal implementation
of a z-order scroll function available to users that uses standard
window controls and operations.

      There have been attempts to add a third-dimension scrolling
capability to standard scroll bars, but each suffers from usability
problems.  For example, the diagonal scroll bar may interfere with
the view of the object, or the "scroll box" which is grafted onto the
3-D object may not be intuitive.

      The current design of scroll bars lends itself well to an
expansion of function in this arena.  The length of a scroll button
reflects the amount of an object shown along that dimension.
Currently, only the position of the button in the scroll shaft is
used (to show where, along the span of the object, the user is
looking).

      Refer to the Figure.  If the user places the mouse cursor
inside the scroll button, the user would interact in the current
manner.  However, if he placed the mouse cursor over an edge of the
button, he would be toggled into a re-size mode, similar to the
re-size mode along window borders.  Feedback would be provided in the
form of an arrow (<-->) along the appropriate dimension (horizontal,
vertical, or diagonal).  If the user drags the button border, the
client area refreshes in real-time, and the user sees a grayed
outline of the  new scroll button dimension.  When he lets go,...