Browse Prior Art Database

Ultrahigh-Density Data Storage with Long Time Stability

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118132D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hilgenkamp, J: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Data can be stored in an extremely condensed manner by writing them with standard printing processes and tailored coding on sheets of plastic or other materials. These sheets may, e.g., be stacked into a cartridge, like Poker-cards into a deck. The devices offer data densities of 10 sup 13 bits/cm/3/ and more, readout speeds of GByte/sec and long term data stability.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Ultrahigh-Density Data Storage with Long Time Stability

      Data can be stored in an extremely condensed manner by writing
them with standard printing processes and tailored coding on sheets
of plastic or other materials.  These sheets may, e.g., be stacked
into a cartridge, like Poker-cards into a deck.  The devices offer
data densities of 10 sup 13 bits/cm/3/ and more, readout speeds of
GByte/sec and long term data stability.

      To convey the idea, the examples of two potential devices are
given which rely on an optimized laser printer and on a commercially
available ink-jet printer, respectively.

      The optimized printer is assumed to have spatial resolution of
one micrometer.  Thus, it can write 10 sup 8 pixels/cm/2/,
corresponding to a total of 5 multiply 10 sup 10 bits onto one A4
foil.  If the foil  had a thickness of 20 micrometers, a volume
storage density of 5 multiply  10 sup 10 bits/cm/3/ is obtained.  If
both sides of the foil are used and the printer is able to print
pixels in 100 different colors, a Petabit of data can be put into the
volume of a magnetooptical disk cartridge used today.  Data densities
may be enhanced further if a multitude of 'inks' are used which
differ by the position of individual  spectral lines.  With a 720dpi
ink-jet printer, using four colors, 10/8/ bits/page or 10/8/
bits/cm/3/ are obtained.

      It seems attractive to use sheets stacked into a cartridge as
storage medium.  One possible technical solution to the mechanics of
such a device is as follows:  After inserting such a cartridge into
the reading device, the reader may open the cartridge and access
protrusions or holes identifying the individual sheets.  To read data
from a sheet, the sheet has to be moved under a microscope-type
objective with coarse positioning only.  To read large amounts of
data stored on adjacent areas of the paper, the sheet may be moved
continuously.  Reading of the data can be done in a fast way using a
microscope objective and a CCD-camera.  The CCD-camera may be a
standard one with a serial read-out.  For high-speed applications,
parallel readout of the pixels with hard-wired electronics is
proposed.  For example, the electronics attached to each...