Browse Prior Art Database

Asynchronous Event Processing in a Graphical User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118150D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Alimpich, CC: AUTHOR [+8]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for asynchronous update of objects presented in a Graphical User Interface (GUI). Asynchronous events may consist of changes to object attributes or of the addition or deletion of associated objects.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Asynchronous Event Processing in a Graphical User Interface

      Disclosed is a method for asynchronous update of objects
presented in a Graphical User Interface (GUI).  Asynchronous events
may consist of changes to object attributes or of the addition or
deletion of associated objects.

      Objects presented in a graphical user interface may vary the
appearance of their icons based on the values of the attributes of
the object or based on the presence or absence of associated objects.
If the GUI objects represent devices on a network, one method of
detecting the current status of an object is to poll the object on a
regular basis.  While polling is necessary for obtaining the initial
status of  an object when the GUI session is started, frequent
polling can cause prohibitive network traffic, especially if there
are many objects of interest.

      A better alternative is a GUI that can receive event messages
asynchronously from the objects of interest.  Then only changes that
are relevant to the presentation need be sent across the network.
Furthermore, three components of the event handling, registration,
dynamic registration by object type, and efficient event
processing, are used to limit the network traffic while maintaining
an accurate presentation of the object status.

      Registration

      When the GUI is initialized it "registers" with the objects of
interest via a client daemon.  If the objects are grouped into
containers, and if the container handles the event processing for all
of its contained objects, the GUI needs only to register with the
appropriate containers.  For example, in a network environment,
objects of interest may be contained in servers that are distributed
throughout the network.  The client daemon passes events from the
objects and/or containers to the GUI.  Each event contains the
information that the GUI needs to identify the correct object as well
as information required to update the status of the object.

      The registration step limits the network traffic that is
required to keep all instances of the GUI notified of relevant
changes.  Events are sent only between objects and/or containers and
those GUIs that register for events from those objects.

      Dynamic registration by object type

      To further reduce network traffic, events are divided into two
categories, those that typically occur infrequently, and those that
may occur frequently but do not usually require close monitoring.
For example, monitoring of printers in a network printing environment
may be necessary and will typically produce events infrequently, such
as when a printer has a pape...