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Improved Palette View Operations in Graphical User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118151D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Donnelly, VA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a Graphical User Interface (GUI), whether it be a traditional windowing type environment or a three dimensional user interface, there is always the problem for the user of negotiating between cooperating display areas.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Improved Palette View Operations in Graphical User Interface

      In a Graphical User Interface (GUI), whether it be a
traditional windowing type environment or a three dimensional user
interface, there is always the problem for the user of negotiating
between cooperating display areas.

      Any display area that has a usable amount of content takes up a
reasonable amount of space on the available screen area.  Working
with more than one primary display area can cause the user to spend
an irritating amount of time moving display areas around the
available desktop to allow viewing and direct manipulation of objects
between areas.  This is especially apparent for palette type
containers, whose whole purpose is to influence the style of other
views on objects through the drag drop mechanism.

      Key augmentation has been used to pick up objects and allow
areas to be moved out of the way before another key augmentation
enables the drop of the object that is currently involved in the drag
operation.  However, these types of key augmentations are difficult
for the user to remember, even if they know that this facility exists
in the first place.

      Therefore, what normally happens in this situation is that the
user spends more time than is necessary on palette type operations
because an amount of display area arrangement needs to take place
first allowing the user to have both source display area and target
drop area visible at the same time to enable easy direct
manipulation.

      The solution described creates a palette view type that is
designed around the primary user task of selecting palette entries
and dragging these entries to unconnected...