Browse Prior Art Database

Object Oriented Programming in a CICS Pseudo Conversational Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118168D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Toase, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

Two significantly different programming models can exist in a CICS* environment: 1. The pseudo conversational model typically used by CICS programmers 2. The object oriented model used in new Object Oriented (OO) applications

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Object Oriented Programming in a CICS Pseudo Conversational Environment

      Two significantly different programming models can exist in a
CICS* environment:
  1.  The pseudo conversational model typically used by CICS
       programmers
  2.  The object oriented model used in new Object Oriented (OO)
       applications

CICS pseudo conversational model

      The pseudo conversational model adopted by the majority of CICS
applications in use today is one in which the application typically
executes in short sharp bursts, or Unit of Work (UOWs), typically
caused by an event from a user or a client.  At the start of each
UOW:

      The application restores its state from data in the commarea or
in files or temporary storage queues.

At the end of each UOW:
  o  The application carefully packages up all its state data,
      and saves this away
  o  All memory and resources associated with it are released
  o  Frequently, a syncpoint is taken in order to ensure that
      all resources are consistently saved

      It is the discipline enforced on application programmers by
this model that gives CICS applications a much higher performance
than other application platforms such as TSO, and the syncpointing
semantics that make CICS the platform of choice for commercial
multi-user applications.

Standard OO model

      In the normal OO model of programming, the program creates a
number of objects as the interaction with the client (person or
program) progresses.  These objects are generally held in the main
storage of the  server processor (or in its paging space).  If they
are persistent, then  they may also be written on a file.  The
lifetime of these objects is generally quite long, and is comparable
to the lifetime of the program
execution.   In the case of an interactive program, it would be
between ten minutes and several hours typically.  A program would
normally have  between fifty and several thousand of these objects in
existence any one  time.  There is no system provided mech...