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Electrical Isolation during Sputtering of Glass Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118185D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Doerner, MF: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for sputter-deposition of insulating overcoat thin films on glass substrates that uses electrical isolation of the substrate as a means to prevent arcing damage. During sputtering of hydrogenated carbon films onto glass substrates, arcing between the grounded pedestal and glass disk can occur. This arcing can cause cracking and chipping of the substrate edge and delamination of the thin films. Electrically isolating the pedestal from ground eliminates this problem.

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Electrical Isolation during Sputtering of Glass Substrates

      Disclosed is a process for sputter-deposition of insulating
overcoat thin films on glass substrates that uses electrical
isolation of the substrate as a means to prevent arcing damage.
During sputtering of hydrogenated carbon films onto glass substrates,
arcing between the grounded pedestal and glass disk can occur.  This
arcing can cause cracking and chipping of the substrate edge and
delamination of the thin films.  Electrically isolating the pedestal
from ground eliminates this problem.

      During sputtering in a single disk system, such as the INTEVAC
350, the disk is held in front of the target on a stainless steel
pedestal and suspended from three grooves to minimize shadowing.  The
pedestal is normally grounded to keep the substrate at a fixed
potential relative to the target.  For electrically insulating
substrates, such as glass, good contact must be maintained between a
conducting surface  film on the substrate and the pedestal in order
to maintain the substrate  potential at ground.  During the
deposition of electrically insulating  films, the substrate can
obtain a significant negative potential. When  the pedestal contacts
are grounded, this can cause arcing between the pedestal and the
substrate.  Arcing damage occurs just adjacent to the  pedestal
contact points.  Electrical isolation of the pedestal eliminates
the arcing problem.  Electrical isolation of the pedestal has...