Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Configuration of Audio Amplifiers in Hi-Fi Audio/Video Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118195D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bisdikian, C: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to configure automatically the audio settings of hi/fi Audio/Video (A/V) "surround-sound" systems to reproduce a realistic three-dimensional acoustics experience for various audio sources like Compact Disks (CDs), video movies, radio broadcasts, etc.. A hierarchical grouping of the control information is also disclosed.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 46% of the total text.

Automatic Configuration of Audio Amplifiers in Hi-Fi Audio/Video
Systems

      Disclosed is a method to configure automatically  the audio
settings of hi/fi Audio/Video (A/V) "surround-sound"  systems to
reproduce a realistic three-dimensional acoustics experience for
various audio sources like Compact Disks (CDs), video movies, radio
broadcasts, etc..  A hierarchical grouping of the control information
is also disclosed.

      In order to "inform"  and control the Audio-Processor/Amplifier
(AP/A) of the settings recommended for reproducing the acoustics
intended for a particular program, the following are needed:
  1.  A method to incorporate (multiplex) the "control"
       information into the audio program.
  2.  A method to demultiplex the control information at the
       audio-processor (or amplifier).
  3.  For a wide acceptance of the disclosed method, a set of
       widely agreed set of standards for interoperability.

      With regard to item number 1, technology exists today, like the
Radio Broadcast Data System (RBDS), whereby with the use of
subcarrier frequencies, additional (digital) information can be
transmitted over the radio-waves.  Also, audio and video CDs carry
more information than  just the audio or video information, e.g.,
they carry information about  the particular CD, the track that is
played, the time elapsed/remaining,  etc..  The same technologies
could be used in our approach and no new multiplexing technologies
need to be invented.  Similarly, with regard  to item number 2, no
new technologies are needed to be invented either,  it is only the
way that the demultiplexed signal need to be interpreted  and
utilized.

The main idea behind our approach is as follows:
  1.  Multiplex control information together with the audio
       signal.
  2.  Demultiplex the control information at the audio-processor
       (or amplifier).
  3.  Use the control information for adjusting the AP/A to
       recommended configuration.

      The presented embodiment, where the audio source is a CD, is
only an example, and similar approaches can be considered for
different audio sources.  Also, other multiplexing and demultiplexing
techniques could be used without altering the intentions of this
disclosure.

      The Figure shows a possible implementation for a CD-player
based audio reproduction system.  Without lack of generality, the
surround-sound audio-processor is assumed to be located within the
audio amplifier.  For the depicted example, it is assumed that the
CD-player output is in analog form.  The additional control
information regarding, say the acoustics settings for a song, are
incorporated during the silence gaps between tracks (which is usually
4 seconds long).  For live recordings that play continuously, this
information could be set in the beginning of the recording and remain
fixed throughout the recording, although other op...