Browse Prior Art Database

Color Display Switching System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118216D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cummings, TF: AUTHOR

Abstract

The purpose of this system is to store, communicate and display specific information and/or images. A unique color switch readily enables each pixel point on a display screen to be changed to any color using shared light sources that service all switches simultaneously.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Color Display Switching System

      The purpose of this system is to store, communicate and display
specific information and/or images.  A unique color switch readily
enables each pixel point on a display screen to be changed to any
color using shared light sources that service all switches
simultaneously.

      Operations: Fig. 1 shows a hairnet of numerous fiber optic
lines 1, etc. surrounding one colored light source 2.  Each line goes
to one "color switch" 3, etc.

      This allows a common centralized sharing of the single light
source among all switches (rather than each switch have its own set
of colored light sources, which would be an extremely large number
and costly).

      In Fig. 2, a number of alternative colored lights, in this case
4, 5 and 6, are available via fiber optic lines 7, 8 and 9 for
possible use to create the desired color to be displayed at pixel
point 15 seen  by the viewer.

      All colors available are constantly being sent to all color
switches 3, etc.  The colors, or lack of color, needed for
combination are controlled by the three circuit lines 10, 11 and 12
(one for each color available), which subsequently determines what
colors come out the switch's exit port 13 and are mixed (or
focused/mixed by a lens) as  they travel down the single optical line
14 (or reflected by a mirror)  to the pixel point 15.

      The Color Switch, Fig. 3, determines what colors will be mixed
and sent to the pixel.  In the switch, the colored light coming down
an optical line reflects off a polished thin film magnet 16, 17 or
18, whichever one is assigned to that particular line, and passes
through the corresponding optical filter 19, 20 or 21; the filter
allows only light with a specific angle of polarization to pass on
through.

      If a specific color is designated to be part of the pixel
image, an electric current is sent through the electrical line to the
magnet.  When the current is on to the magnet, the reflected light's
angle of polarization is changed by the interaction of the current
with the characteristics of the magnet; since the angle of
polarization now  coincides with the filter's angle of polarization
for that particular light source, the beam is allowed to pass through
(and conversely, if it  is not the proper angle, i.e., no current to
the magnet, then no light  can pass through).

      All of the lights that the switch's filters pass on are focused
at one single exit port 13; some colors may be...