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Browse Prior Art Database

Spring Finger Electro-Magnetic Interference Shield

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118226D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dials, EN: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is design concept incorporating a plastic and aluminum laminate that forms an Electro-Magnetic Conduction (EMC) barrier around the Direct Access and Storage Device (DASD) components in a computer enclosure. The Laminate consists of a semi-hard aluminum sheet approximately three thousandth of an inch thick which is mated with a thin sheet of mylar by means of conductive adhesive. The laminate is made such that the elasticity of the aluminum is greater than the ductile properties of the mylar. When the laminate is bent out of position (as when a DASD is placed through it), it acts like a spring applying the neccessary force to maintain grounding contact. The mylar is stripped from the aluminum in strategic locations where it contacts the chassis and holds it in place.

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Spring Finger Electro-Magnetic Interference Shield

      Disclosed is design concept incorporating a plastic and
aluminum laminate that forms an Electro-Magnetic Conduction (EMC)
barrier around the Direct Access and Storage Device (DASD) components
in a computer enclosure.  The Laminate consists of a semi-hard
aluminum sheet approximately three thousandth of an inch thick which
is mated with a thin sheet of mylar by means of conductive adhesive.
The laminate is made such that the elasticity of the aluminum is
greater than the ductile properties of the mylar.  When the laminate
is bent out of position (as when a DASD is placed through it), it
acts like a spring applying the neccessary force to maintain
grounding contact.  The mylar is stripped from the aluminum in
strategic locations  where it contacts the chassis and holds it in
place.

      The Figure shows this idea in use with a typical DASD.  The
laminate is perforated to allow passage of the DASD (Compact
Disk-Read Only Memory (CD-ROM) or Floppy disk drive) through its
boundary.  As the  DASD is inserted through the opening, flaps
created by the perforation  geometry form springs that touch the
periphery of the drive.  Because of the laminate design, these flaps
act as springs, making EMC contact  with the device.  This action
'seals' the box against Electro-Magnetic  Interference (EMI) leakage.