Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Design Checker for Finite Element Analysis Software

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118227D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Munce Jr, AC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for performing automatic inspection of the results of a finite element analysis to determine if there is any indication that preset constraints, design rules, and/or conventions have been violated in the present design and loading case. The principle components are: 1. a method for allowing a user to input design constraint data; 2. a method for determining whether design constraints have been violated, either by direction calculation or by inference; and 3. a method for warning the user when a design constraint has been violated.

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Automatic Design Checker for Finite Element Analysis Software

      Disclosed is a method for performing automatic inspection of
the results of a finite element analysis to determine if there is any
indication that preset constraints, design rules, and/or conventions
have been violated in the present design and loading case.  The
principle components are:
  1.  a method for allowing a user to input design constraint
       data;
  2.  a method for determining whether design constraints have
       been violated, either by direction calculation or by
       inference; and
  3.  a method for warning the user when a design constraint
       has been violated.

      Design constraint data sets allowable bounds on any variable
which is calculable from the results of a finite element analysis
made over a mesh representation of an object.  Examples of such
design constraint data include:
  1.  maximum stress over a meshed object less than 10 MPa;
  2.  displacement at a given location of the meshed object
       between -0.1 mm and 0.1 mm; and
  3.  reaction force on a given support of the meshed object
       less than 1 N.

      The input step can be satisfied most naturally by a variety of
mechanisms.  The maximum stresses (e.g., normal, shear, von Mises)
could be included in a material lookup table for each material type.
This approach allows an expert to set them once for all subsequent
analyses based on the local material set and safety factors.  The
range of displacements and reaction forces can best be specified in
the editor employed to specify boundary conditions and loadings.  It
woul...