Browse Prior Art Database

Coordinated Voice and Data Transfer Over Public Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118261D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 107K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hill, CJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Where an organization has a callcenter that is distributed over more than one location using the public network (PSTN), then it is very difficult to coordinate the transfer of a telephone call over the PSTN with the transfer of data over a data network. For example, a customer call arrives at location A and data is associated with the call (via a Voice Response Unit (VRU) or personal contact). The call is then transferred to location B, but because the data is not associated with the call, the customer has to repeat information that has already been supplied, such as a reference number. This means longer customer calls and reduced customer satisfaction.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Coordinated Voice and Data Transfer Over Public Network

      Where an organization has a callcenter that is distributed over
more than one location using the public network (PSTN), then it is
very difficult to coordinate the transfer of a telephone call over
the PSTN with the transfer of data over a data network.  For example,
a customer call arrives at location A and data is associated with the
call (via a Voice Response Unit (VRU) or personal contact).  The call
is then transferred to location B, but because the data is not
associated with the call, the customer has to repeat information that
has already been supplied, such as a reference number.  This means
longer customer calls and reduced customer satisfaction.

      The solution described utilizes a PSTN service known as Dialled
Number Information Service (DNIS) which provides the call terminating
PBX with data that identifies which of several possible directory
numbers was dialled by the caller.  DNIS is mostly used where several
different 1-800 numbers are terminated at the same PBX in order to
route a call to the correct answering agent.

      Computer Telephony Integration (CTI) products, such as CallPath
products by IBM*, allow the DNIS information that is associated with
an inbound call at a PBX to be retrieved and used by software in the
data processing system that is attached to the PBX.  Also, CTI
products enable telephone calls to be controlled by the data
processing system.

      Assume two locations, A and B, each having a PBX linked via
a CTI product to Data Processing (DP) equipment.  The DP equipment
might be one central facility, linked to both locations A and B, or a
distributed facility linked via a data network between A and B.

      A list of directory numbers is supplied by the PSTN provider,
which if dialled from anywhere in the network, will terminate on the
PBX at B and provide DNIS data.

      The DP system is programmed to hold a table made up of a list
of entries.  Each entry corresponds to an individual directory number
and contains the following elements:
  1.  A directory number to be dialled for the PBX at B.
  2.  The associated DNIS data that will be delivered at B.
  3.  A flag that can be in either "locked" or "free" state.
  4.  A customer data reference, initially blank.

      A telephone call arrives at A, is answered by an agent at A,
and customer data in the DP system is associated both with the agent
terminal and the corresponding agent telephone.  The DP system can
now be programmed to transfer this telephone call to an agent on PBX
B, keeping the customer data association, as follows:
  1.  The table of directory numbers is searched for an entry
       in the "free" state.  When one is found, it is marked
       as "locked".
  2.  The customer data reference element is changed to refer
       to the customer data associated with the telephone call
       at A.
  3...