Browse Prior Art Database

General WIN-OS/2 - OS/2 Inter Process Communication Queues

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118326D
Original Publication Date: 1996-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jones, DL: AUTHOR

Abstract

In order for OS/2* subsystems, such as CM/2, Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), DB2, etc., to support Windows applications, an OS/2 to WIN-OS/2 Inter Process Communication (IPC) mechanism is required. This is necessary so the Windows process can communicate with the subsystem process.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

General WIN-OS/2 - OS/2 Inter Process Communication Queues

      In order for OS/2* subsystems, such as CM/2, Transmission
Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), DB2, etc., to support
Windows applications, an OS/2 to WIN-OS/2 Inter Process Communication
(IPC) mechanism is required.  This is necessary so the Windows
process can communicate with the subsystem process.

      Typically, this IPC is implemented with a Virtual Device Driver
(VDD) which is written specifically for the service to be provided.
For example, to support Windows-based High Level Language
Applications Programming Interface (HLLAPI) applications CM/2
developed a VDD to provide the IPC between the Windows process
requiring the service the OS/2 process which provided the service.

      Since OS/2 Virtual Device Drivers are nontrivial to develop the
need existed for a generalized WIN-OS/2 to OS/2 IPC mechanism which
would make it easier for subsystems to provide services to Windows
applications.

      The IPC mechanism developed was a Queue function.  A queue is
an ordered list of data that a process can use to receive information
from other processes.  The processes can be either OS/2 processes or
WIN-OS/2 processes.  Processes pass information to a queue in the
form of elements.  The process that owns the queue can then read the
elements from the queue.

      The interface to the queue is identical for both OS/2 and
Windows programs.  It is simply a set of Applications P...