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Browse Prior Art Database

Graphical Integration of Heterogeneous Computing Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118365D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 154K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brooks, AP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Figure AS/400s Inserted into Workstation Model, One Partially Expanded. The Figure shows several logical object types, including database, file systems, jobs, messages, printer output, printers, systems, users, and user groups.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Graphical Integration of Heterogeneous Computing Systems

Figure  AS/400s Inserted into Workstation Model, One Partially
Expanded.  The Figure shows several logical object types, including
database, file systems, jobs, messages, printer output, printers,
systems, users, and user groups.

      Disclosed is a method of integrating servers, hosts, and other
connected computer systems into a client workstation's visual model.
In conjunction with this, the traditional tree or explorer view is
broadened to feature higher level, logical elements, not just the
traditional contents of files and printers.  The intent is to insert
servers and other accessible connected systems into the workstation's
Graphical User Interface (GUI), extending it with new nodes, and
allowing those to be expanded to an open ended set of logical
elements.

      For the workstation user, the result is a highly integrated
view of all of the connected computers he or she may wish to access
explicitly.  And each of those connected computers may be selectively
expanded to access its constituent, relevant, logical parts.

      Tree structures have been used for some time to show physical
containment, such as disk drives, directories, subdirectories,
folders, and files.  This is fine as far as it goes but is a strict,
inflexible model.  Usually, all items in each container are shown,
including many that a user rarely if ever needs to deal with.  This
places a significant burden on the user to learn and remember what
objects are of actual interest and where each is stored.

      This disclosure proposes to broaden the use of the tree
structure and its derivative forms such as explorers, to display
'logical' objects and their relevant constituent parts.  Such a
broadened view allows a more flexible user model to be created,
including simplified, higher level structures that can hide where
many things reside, yet allow a user to access relevant objects
through the logical organization.  This reduces the burden on users
to remember how things are stored.  Instead, the user can concentrate
on a logical organization that can be largely independent of how and
where things are stored and which can hide or encapsulate many if not
most lower level objects.

      As an example, this disclosure shows a tree/explorer view
extended to include AS/400* servers, and a set of high level, logical
'parts' of an AS/400.  The parts initially include Database, Jobs,
Messages, Printer Output, Printers, System level objects, and Users
and Groups.  This set is chosen to allow system operators and
administrators to manage an AS/400 more easily via the graphical user
interface on a client workstation.  It also includes File Systems, in
case an administrator wishes to see all con...