Browse Prior Art Database

Logo Switch

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118394D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Taylor, LG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A typical manufacturer of electrical/electronic goods produces a very wide range of products in various shapes and sizes. Most of these products have a power switch of some sort located somewhere on the product casing.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Logo Switch

      A typical manufacturer of electrical/electronic goods produces
a very wide range of products in various shapes and sizes.  Most of
these products have a power switch of some sort located somewhere on
the product casing.

      The problem with this state of affairs is that there is very
little commonality between different products regarding the position
of the power switch.  This can create problems for users who are
never certain where they should look first to find the switch.

      The described solution uses the manufacturer's trademark, or
logo, which is usually prominently placed on the product, to locate
the power switch.

      The power switch itself may be operated in a number of
ways.  If the switch is actually used to interrupt the mains
electricity going into a product, the logo could be placed on a panel
which acts directly on a switch, or through a pushrod, or the logo
could even form  the front face of a rocker switch.

      If the product is one of the increasing number where the power
switch is not used to interrupt mains electricity, such as portable
PC's and monitors where the microcontroller is run constantly,
another type of  switch could be used.  Where this is the case, the
normal microswitch could be attached to the logo.  An alternative,
where the logo includes  a number of separate elements as in the
'bar' version of the trademark  'IBM', is to use a touch sensitive
switch formed by the 'bars'.

      The Figure illustrates a possible implementation for a computer
monitor.  In this circuit, diagram Cs represents the capacitance of
the bars in the IBM Logo.  Alternate bars in the Logo would be
connected to  either ground or the 5v rail through R1.  Rf represents
the resistance  of a finger touching the Logo.  When a touch is made,
Rf discharges C and the voltage on the gate of Q1 reduces.  When the
voltage on the gate has dropped by the threshold vo...