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Temperature Zone Controlled Chuck for Improved Yield near Wafer Edge

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118412D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Guidotti, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

To regulate the temperature distribution over a sample during a a manufacturing process, it is sometimes advantageous to be able to construct a tunable temperature distribution within a chuck (Fig. 1) or at the interface, between chuck and sample (Fig. 2). For example, during semiconductor manufacturing, it may be necessary to tune an etch rate or deposition rate near a wafer edge with respect to the etch or deposition rate near the wafer center. This may be easily done by tailoring the radial temperature distribution across a chuck (Fig. 1) or the rate at which heat is transferred between sample and chuck (Fig. 2).

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Temperature Zone Controlled Chuck for Improved Yield near Wafer Edge

      To regulate the temperature distribution over a sample during a
a manufacturing process, it is sometimes advantageous to be able to
construct a tunable temperature distribution within a chuck (Fig. 1)
or at the interface, between chuck and sample (Fig. 2).  For example,
during semiconductor manufacturing, it may be necessary to tune an
etch rate or deposition rate near a wafer edge with respect to the
etch or deposition rate near the wafer center.  This may be easily
done by tailoring the radial temperature distribution across a chuck
(Fig. 1) or the rate at which heat is transferred between sample and
chuck (Fig. 2).

      Described are two practical ways of providing tunable
temperature distributions over a sample surface when the sample is
held by a chuck during a manufacturing process (Fig. 1).

      A fluid can be circulated within the chuck, just below the
surface within separate conduits or channels, the fluid in each being
at a different temperature.  To achieve a radial temperature
gradient, for example, concentric channels are used within which a
fluid at a desired temperature can be circulated.

      In cases where a surface of a sample is held in firm contact
with a surface of the holding block or chuck, open channels may be
formed on the top surface of the chuck so that when intimate contact
between chuck and sample is formed, the open channels are closed and
form a...