Browse Prior Art Database

Non-Canonical Date Representation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118458D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Halbert, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

When working with data indexed by date (for example, a diary), the user often needs to move several days forwards or backwards relative to a given date (in particular from the date displayed on a panel). The date interface often makes this unnecessarily difficult.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 96% of the total text.

Non-Canonical Date Representation

      When working with data indexed by date (for example, a diary),
the user often needs to move several days forwards or backwards
relative to a given date (in particular from the date displayed on a
panel).  The date interface often makes this unnecessarily difficult.

      For example, to move forwards one week from a diary entry for
28 June, the user has to perform a non-trivial mental calculation to
arrive at the desired target date of 5 July.

      The solution described provides a date nomenclature in which
there are an infinity of ways of representing a given date, all of
which are equivalent.  Each equivalence class of dates is represented
uniquely by the standard canonical form in use currently.
  For example:
  432 May 1995 = 66 May 1996 = 35 June 1996 = 5 July 1996

      Using this nomenclature in order to move 7 days forwards from
28 June displayed on a panel, the user needs merely to add 7 to the
28 to produce the date 35 June.  In responding, the computer system
reduces the date to the usual canonical form, namely 5 July.

      This could be taken a step further by allowing dates to be
incremented or decremented by integer numbers of days.
  For example:
  (28 June) + 7 = 28 + 7 June = 35 June = 5 July.

      Similarly, the archaic representation of dates as either AD or
BC (with no year zero) may be rationalized by regarding the AD and BC
calendars as equivalent but entirely separate date...