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Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Surveillance Using the Internet

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118473D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Byford, D: AUTHOR

Abstract

Current video-surveillance systems use cameras which feed through to permanently manned control centers or to videotape. Real-time security can only be achieved if the substantial cost of permanent monitoring is incurred. This means that many small businesses, schools, clubs, sports grounds and other small entities cannot afford real-time video-surveillance (especially 'out of hours').

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Remote Surveillance Using the Internet

      Current video-surveillance systems use cameras which feed
through to permanently manned control centers or to videotape.
Real-time security can only be achieved if the substantial cost of
permanent monitoring is incurred.  This means that many small
businesses, schools,  clubs, sports grounds and other small entities
cannot afford real-time  video-surveillance (especially 'out of
hours').

      This problem can be addressed relatively inexpensively by
linking video-surveillance cameras to Internet servers.  This enables
suitably authorized users to access the video-feed at their Personal
Computer (PC) (or any Internet enabled PC or device).  For example,
in a school a governor, teacher, or pupil may be authorized to
monitor the school's video-surveillance cameras.

      The attachment of video-surveillance cameras to the Internet
may be used to provide other facilities, such as checking traffic
conditions before making a journey and car parking space
availability.