Browse Prior Art Database

Persistent Context for World Wide Web Browsers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118489D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cross, TS: AUTHOR

Abstract

The World Wide Web (WWW) Internet Service enables users with a browser facility to access and retrieve linked documents on different servers using the hyperlink designated "http". So-called Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) "Cookies" are known which provide a mechanism for server side connections to store and retrieve persistent information on the client side connection. So, a WWW browser can now store some context information if it has managed to retrieve data from the server. If the data server was unavailable, then it has no context and will have to try again to get the data.

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Persistent Context for World Wide Web Browsers

      The World Wide Web (WWW) Internet Service enables users with a
browser facility to access and retrieve linked documents on different
servers using the hyperlink designated "http".  So-called Hyper Text
Transfer Protocol (HTTP) "Cookies" are known which provide a
mechanism for server side connections to store and retrieve
persistent information on the client side connection.  So, a WWW
browser can now store some context information if it has managed to
retrieve data from the server.  If the data server was unavailable,
then it has no context and will have to try again to get the data.

      This property of HTTP Cookies can enable WWW browsers to work
with asynchronous message queuing products such as IBM's MQSeries* as
the context can be made part of the request for data.  Hence, if the
data was not available, the context can be used to see if it has
subsequently arrived, rather than just requesting it again.

      The flow from initial request from the Web browser to an
MQSeries application is shown below:
          HTML                   ---->RequestQ---->
                                 put          get
  Web     --->  Web   -> MQGateP                   MQ
  Browser <---  Server           get          put  Application
                                 <----ResponseQ<---
           HTML

      An Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) form on the web browser
issues a POST request to the web server which starts the MQGateP
gateway program.  MQGateP now takes the form data and places it in an
MQSeries message and puts the message on a queue to be read by an
MQSeries application.  It then performs a "get" on a reply queue.  If
the data is available, then it can go straight back to the web
browser.  However, if the data is not available, then a response is
still needed for the web browser and this needs to include the state
information.  This is achieved by sending back a Cookie along with an
HTML page informing the browser that the data was currently
unavailable.

      The Cookie is used to store a tag to the request; this relates
to the message id of the message put on the application queue and
that is then used as the correlation id on a get to retrieve the
reply message.

      Subsequent POS...