Browse Prior Art Database

Using Background Colors on Entry Field in a User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118512D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Campbell, RG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Often, when a user is asked to input data into an entry field for a program in a Graphical User Interface (GUI) environment, it can be unclear to the user where an error has occurred after the user submits the data for entry. Many applications use a "pop-up message box" to tell the user that an error has occurred. This is an annoyance because it interrupts the workflow by having the user deal with the message box first and then deal with the error. Disclosed is a method which makes it very clear to the user exactly where the error has occurred.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 72% of the total text.

Using Background Colors on Entry Field in a User Interface

      Often, when a user is asked to input data into an entry field
for a program in a Graphical User Interface (GUI) environment, it can
be unclear to the user where an error has occurred after the user
submits the data for entry.  Many applications use a "pop-up message
box" to tell the user that an error has occurred.  This is an
annoyance because it interrupts the workflow by having the user deal
with the message box first and then deal with the error.  Disclosed
is a method which makes it very clear to the user exactly where the
error has occurred.

      In a graphical environment, such as Windows*, OS/2**, AIX**,
etc., when an error has occurred that the user must fix, the cursor
is placed on the appropriate entry field and it turns the entry field
background color to RED.  This draws the user's attention immediately
to the place where the error occurred.  (In the specific situation of
LAN Network Manager for OS/2, Version 2.0, a command is issued which
makes a small beep and puts a message at the bottom of the window in
a specially designated message area explaining exactly what error has
occurred; i.e., "Number must be between 1 and 100" if the user were
to have typed in 147.)  Examples would be logon passwords, addresses,
inventory, web-page design for the World Wide Web (especially given
the plethora of web-pages!), etc.

      There are other applications for this method as well.  For
...