Browse Prior Art Database

Tear-Open Window for a Control Panel

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118516D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Happ, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a tear-open window in a first display screen, allowing a control panel from a second display screen with a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to be displayed, so that a user can work with controls of the second display screen in a multitasking environment without having to switch to it. This type of window is called "tear open" because it starts small, being opened by movement of a mouse pointer as if the work space of the first display screen were being torn open.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Tear-Open Window for a Control Panel

      Disclosed is a tear-open window in a first display screen,
allowing a control panel from a second display screen with a
Graphical User Interface (GUI) to be displayed, so that a user can
work with controls of the second display screen in a multitasking
environment without having to switch to it.  This type of window is
called "tear open" because it starts small, being opened by movement
of a mouse pointer as if the work space of the first display screen
were being torn open.

      Fig. 1 shows an example of a tear-open window having both the
first and second display screens generated by a single application.
The display is filled with text (1) from a full-screen dictation
application before a tear-open window (2) is used to provide access,
with a mouse or other pointing device, to various word processing
controls (3).  Since the primary input modality of the dictation
application is speech, all graphical (GUI) controls have been removed
from its workspace screen, for access only through the tear-open
window (2).  With this window (2) fully open, the controls (3) look
like an application window which has been sized to minimize or
eliminate the workspace.  With this window (2) open, the mouse, the
keyboard, and speech can be used to perform various functions.

      When the user of the dictation application wishes to open the
tear-open window, he performs a pre-determined action, such as
holding down the right mouse button or saying a particular speech
command. The  mouse pointer (4) then appears at the bottom right
corner of the tear-open window (2).  As he moves the pointer (4) with
the mouse, this  window (2) enlarges, revealing additional c...