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Browse Prior Art Database

Ultrasonic Cleaning System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118518D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Case, JR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Most electronic components today are cleaned by chemicals, abrasive mechanical mechanisms, or sprays. Brushes, driven by motors and belts, are subject to wear and regular maintenance. Chemical cleaning is undesirable from an environmental, as well as operator safety standpoint. Ultrasonic cleaning usually includes a static head of fluid in a tank that is agitated by an ultrasonic vibrational source. Many of these current methods of cleaning simply redeposit contaminants on the components in new locations on the surfaces of the components.

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Ultrasonic Cleaning System

      Most electronic components today are cleaned by chemicals,
abrasive mechanical mechanisms, or sprays.  Brushes, driven by motors
and belts, are subject to wear and regular maintenance.  Chemical
cleaning is undesirable from an environmental, as well as operator
safety standpoint.  Ultrasonic cleaning usually includes a static
head of fluid in a tank that is agitated by an ultrasonic vibrational
source.  Many of these current methods of cleaning simply redeposit
contaminants on the components in new locations on the surfaces of
the components.

      An Ultrasonic Cleaning System is shown in Fig. 1.  A magnified
view of the ultrasonic hardware is shown in Fig. 2.  The system is
used to clean contaminants from the surface of electronic
components.  Particulates as small as 0.2 microns in cross section
are successfully removed.  The system shown may be used to clean such
components as Data Acquisition Storage Device (DASD) read heads.  It
is a relatively inexpensive, simple, and reliable method of cleaning
at the sub-micron level with a dynamic fluid flow that carries away
contaminants off of the component.

      Referring to Fig. 2, a 20 K-hertz ultrasonic generator (1) is
shown.  It vibrates a titanium horn (2) over a vacuum fixture (3)
that contains several hundred DASD read heads.  The generator/horn is
oscillated back and forth by an eccentric rotor actuator driven by a
motor (6).  De-ionized water (DI water) flows...