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No-Clean Mini-Pot Repair Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118565D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cox, KR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process by which no-clean flux can be used to repair electrical assemblies at the mini-pot. This process uses a semi-permanent Ultraviolet (UV) curable polymer to wall in the area to be repaired. The wall is used to hold the no-clean flux in place during the repair process.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 76% of the total text.

No-Clean Mini-Pot Repair Process

      Disclosed is a process by which no-clean flux can be used to
repair electrical assemblies at the mini-pot.  This process uses a
semi-permanent Ultraviolet (UV) curable polymer to wall in the area
to be repaired.  The wall is used to hold the no-clean flux in place
during the repair process.

      This process is used to repair cards that must be subjected
to a solder fountain (mini-pot) repair process to replace or install
components.  The components being replaced must be desoldered from
the raw card and then replaced with new components or the solder is
reflowed to allow the components to be pushed into the correct
position.

      This new process allows for the use of no-clean fluxes to be
used when repairing cards with the mini-pot.  The previous process
used water soluble fluxes only because the water soluble fluxes were
viscous enough to remain in the area to be reflowed long enough for
the replacement.  Whereas, no-clean fluxes are too waterlike (low
viscosity) to remain in a fixed location long enough for the reflow
process.

Following are the steps required for the new process:
  1.  Apply polymer Dymax* 944 around the leads of the
       pin-in-hole component to be reflowed.  Ensure that
       the polymer makes a closed path around the leads.  The
       height of the polymer path should be at least 1/8" high.
  2.  Expose the polymer to a UV light source for eight seconds
     ...