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Keyboard Input System Based on Vocabulary Database with Reduced Key Set

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118576D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Taniguchi, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for text entry for portable systems. This article describes a keyboard system whose layout is basically deduced from the QWERTY keyboard layout with each finger assigned to a set of characters. The system uses a vocabulary database to eliminate the ambiguity of a user's typing. Fig. 1 shows an example of the keyboard layout of this system. The method of inputting with this keyboard is based on a method of touch-typing. For example, to input a word "type", a user types the "F" key (4), "J" key (5), ";" key (8), "D" key (3). The ambiguity of the input is reduced by using a vocabulary database. The system selects a couple of candidate words and displays a most appropriate word. If the displayed word is not intended by the user, then a user can type "space" key (9) to obtain the next candidate word.

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Keyboard Input System Based on Vocabulary Database with Reduced Key
Set

      Disclosed is a system for text entry for portable systems.
This article describes a keyboard system whose layout is basically
deduced from the QWERTY keyboard layout with each finger assigned to
a set of characters.  The system uses a vocabulary database to
eliminate the ambiguity of a user's typing.  Fig. 1 shows an example
of the keyboard layout of this system.  The method of inputting with
this keyboard is based on a method of touch-typing.  For example, to
input a word "type", a user types the "F" key (4), "J" key (5), ";"
key (8), "D" key (3).  The ambiguity of the input is reduced by using
a vocabulary database.  The system selects a couple of candidate
words and displays a most appropriate word.  If the displayed word is
not intended by the user, then a user can type "space" key (9) to
obtain the next candidate word.

      Fig. 2 shows the relationship between the user type and
transformation of functions which is applied for the example keyboard
layout.  In addition to the keys for inputting alphabetic characters
(10), the "delete" key for deleting a character (11), the "space" key
for separating words (12), and moving to the next/previous word
candidate (13).  The layout of the keyboard shown in Fig. 1 is
modified, depending  on languages and purposes.