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Browse Prior Art Database

Etched Microcavities for Mechanical Clamping of Atomic Force Sensors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118595D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bayer, T: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a micromechanical sensor for the Atomic Force Microscope/Scanning Tunneling Microscope (AFM/STM) profilometry comprising a mounting block and a cantilever beam with a tip at one end, wherein the mounting block has an etched microcavity embedding a flat spring for mechanical clamping.

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Etched Microcavities for Mechanical Clamping of Atomic Force Sensors

      Disclosed is a micromechanical sensor for the Atomic Force
Microscope/Scanning Tunneling Microscope (AFM/STM) profilometry
comprising a mounting block and a cantilever beam with a tip at one
end, wherein the mounting block has an etched microcavity embedding a
flat spring for mechanical clamping.

      The several parts of a sensor used in a AFM or STM are
micromechanically manufactured from one piece of material.  The
mounting block is attached to a piezoelectric bimorph by temporarily
glueing techniques or by a flat spring.  Both these known methods
show several  problems.

      The temporary gluing with electrically conductive adhesives
causes problems with the appropriate application, dosage rate and
removal of surplus adhesive which also could contaminate the
substrate under investigation.  Using gluing techniques for the
attachment, however, assures that the cantilever may be deposited
parallelly to the surface  of the substrate to be investigated.

      Mechanically fixing the mounting block with a tiny and thin
flat spring (100 - 200 &mu.m thick) requires inclining the cantilever
and moving it down to the substrate to avoid any contact of the flat
spring with the substrate during profiling the surface of the
substrate.

      The height of tip 1 in Fig. 1 is about 10 &mu.m.  A flat spring
of about 100 &mu.m positioned near this tip would massively project
over the...