Browse Prior Art Database

Mechanism for Visual Lists and Selections

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118675D
Original Publication Date: 1997-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hanna, PF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique that allows users to select from large yet visible lists of choices in order to overcome deficiencies with conventional methods. Current selection mechanisms are basically linear in nature, for example, selection lists like the OS/2* Container. There are some specific controls that wrap through selection choices, for example, Spin Button Controls. However, the total set of choices in either case may not be visible to end users. Additionally, when a selection on such a list leads to another set of choices, these choices are typically not visible to end users.

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Mechanism for Visual Lists and Selections

      Disclosed is a technique that allows users to select from large
yet visible lists of choices in order to overcome deficiencies with
conventional methods.  Current selection mechanisms are basically
linear in nature, for example, selection lists like the OS/2*
Container. There  are some specific controls that wrap through
selection choices, for example, Spin Button Controls.  However, the
total set of choices in either case may not be visible to end users.
Additionally, when a selection on such a list leads to another set of
choices, these choices  are typically not visible to end users.

      In addition to providing conventional mechanisms, the technique
herein provides the following enhancements (potentially as a new
family of selection controls):
  o  allow all choices to be displayed, e.g., as in a circular
      list;
  o  represent all choices in a visual manner, e.g., via icons;
  o  the initial view of the selection list can appear as if a
      user were "looking down" upon a ring of choices;
  o  more expert use allows the circle to tilt on one or more
      axes;
  o  on tilted representations of the ring, choices "closer" to
      the user appear larger than choices that are visually further
      away;
  o  selection of a choice brings the choice to the front of the
      circle; and
  o  as more choices are available, the icons can be brought
      closer together to form a visual "continuous band" of
      choices.

      In o...