Browse Prior Art Database

Tagging Objects to Form an Arbitrary Group

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118694D
Original Publication Date: 1997-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berry, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique that allows a user to tag objects in a 3D environment to create arbitrary groups. The tag might be expressed in the form of a text label, a color, or other attribute assigned to each object. The user can operate on a group of tagged objects to cause an action to be applied to all members of the tagged group.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Tagging Objects to Form an Arbitrary Group

      Disclosed is a technique that allows a user to tag objects in a
3D environment to create arbitrary groups.  The tag might be
expressed in the form of a text label, a color, or other attribute
assigned to each object.  The user can operate on a group of tagged
objects to cause  an action to be applied to all members of the
tagged group.

      Current 3D user environments, such as found in games and in
virtual worlds created using Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML)
on the Internet, allow the user to interact with objects such as
telephones, Compact Disk (CD) players, calculators, etc.  Users are
typically allowed to move objects, change their size, modify other
object settings, and delete the objects.  The user often finds it
necessary to perform the same action on more than one object.

      Current 2D Graphical User Interface (GUI) interfaces often
provide means for users to identify groups of objects by using
selection techniques or by using a container object, such as a
folder, to hold all  of the desired objects.  Both of these
approaches have significant disadvantages, especially in a real-world
3D environment.

      The selection technique is not persistent.  A group is
preserved only so long as the selection is not changed.  Some
graphics and presentation applications provide a group action that
creates a persistent group but the objects must all be located within
the same drawing window.  The folder technique for grouping is
inadequate because  it requires that the user move the objects to be
grouped to a single common location, the folder, or create surrogate
objects that are grouped  in the folder.

      Current business-oriented 3D environments allow users to
distribute objects throughout a simulated world.  However, they do
not provide a specific technique for allowing users to group objects.
Thus, there is currently no way for users to operate on a group of
o...