Browse Prior Art Database

Archiving Agent for the World Wide Web

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118728D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Braendli, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is an autonomous agent, written in Java, which locally archives World Wide Web documents deemed important by the user. These locally archived documents are then quickly available when needed.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Archiving Agent for the World Wide Web

      Disclosed is an autonomous agent, written in Java, which
locally archives World Wide Web documents deemed important by the
user.  These locally archived documents are then quickly available
when needed.

      The Problem:  Once useful information has been found on the
Web, a user's problems continue.  The Web is dynamic, to say the
least: Web pages come and go; Web servers move and even disappear;
Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) change.  Kahle (1) writes that
".... estimates put the average lifetime for a URL at 44 days."
Dynamism and lack of permanence on the Web are a real problem.  The
usual scenario  is that a user has found a valuable document and
wants to ensure Web-like  access to it for the future.

      Of course, the user is free to make local copies of the Web
page which were found.  Some browsers have functions which allow a
local copy of a Web page to be made, but neither catalogs it (as a
bookmark, for example) nor resolves relative URLs (meaning URLs
pointing to the same server and specified as a relative address).  A
function with  all the conveniences normally associated with browsing
the WWW would be  welcome.

A description of the program flow follows:

User Actions:
  1.  The user starts a browser.  The browser sets a lock on its
       bookmark file.
  2.  The user sets a bookmark for an important Web page.
  3.  The user adds a unique character-group "earmark" under the
       bookmark's "properties".  Different earmarks are optionally
       used to specify how many levels of references should be
       locally stored.
  4.  Several bookmarks with an earmark may be set.
  5.  The user leaves the Netscape* browser.  The browser removes
       the lock on the bookmark file.

Agent Actions:
  1.  The agent periodically monitors the bookmark file.  The
       browser locks the file while running.
  2.  The agent detects "no lock" on the bookmark file.
  3.  The agent retrieves and downloads the earmarked Web pages.
  4.  The agent optionally downloads Web pages referenced on
       down-loaded pages, etc., recursively, provided the links
       lead to the same Web server.
  5.  The agent makes local copies of downloaded pages.
  6.  The a...