Browse Prior Art Database

System for Running Unchanged Java Sockets Applications on Non-Internet Protocol Networks or on Higher-Function Internal Protocol Networks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118783D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ferree, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a system for enabling existing Java applications to run, unchanged, over transports other than Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). The system also enables these existing applications to run better, unchanged, over TCP/IP networks by taking advantage of more sophisticated functionality, such as the Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

System for Running Unchanged Java Sockets Applications on Non-Internet
Protocol Networks or on Higher-Function Internal Protocol Networks

      Disclosed is a system for enabling existing Java applications
to run, unchanged, over transports other than Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP).  The system also enables these
existing applications to run better, unchanged, over TCP/IP networks
by taking advantage of more sophisticated functionality, such as the
Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP).

      Today, the Java programming environment is specific to TCP/IP
networks.  One of the core Java packages is java.net.  The java.net
Application Programming Interface (API) is a simplified sockets
interface and the supporting java.net socket implementation provides
access to fairly simple TCP/IP networks -- access to networks beyond
a firewall is not supported, for example.

      This system extends the Java programming environment and
existing applications to additional and/or more sophisticated
transports.

The most frequently-used constructor for the Java Socket class is:
      public Socket(String host, int port) ...  ;

The host parameter is assumed to contain a TCP/IP hostname
(ferree.raleigh.ibm.com) or an IP address (9.37.87.178) -- either of
which is provided in the form of a Java String object.  The port
parameter contains an integer port number.

This presents two problems:
  o  The addressing scheme used by other networking protocols
      does not always fit nicely into a (String, int)
      specification.  For example, a Systems Network Architecture
      (SNA) address consists of a Logical Unit (LU) name, mode
      name, and Transaction Program (TP) name -- three pieces
      of information, all Strings.
  o  The constructor lacks a parameter for specifying
      "class-of-service" information -- for example,
      Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) class of service
      or the resource reservation information in RSVP.

      The disclosed system assumes no change to the java.net API or
to applications written to the java.net API.

The system of the following steps:
  1.  Use the java.net host parameter to contain any network's
       addressing information.  In the case of an SNA network,
       for example, the host parameter would be used to pass
       in the target LU name, mode name, and TP name
       information.  In the case of an ATM network, the host
       parameter would carry the ATM addressing information.  In
       these situations, the integer port parameter is assumed to
   ...