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Transcribing Telephone Transactions

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118799D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Byford, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Ticket agencies, mail order firms, help desks, and other services provided through the telephone frequently use answering machines out of hours or in busy periods to record orders and other information from users of the service. It is a considerable task to transcribe and process this information.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Transcribing Telephone Transactions

      Ticket agencies, mail order firms, help desks, and other
services provided through the telephone frequently use answering
machines out of hours or in busy periods to record orders and other
information from users of the service.  It is a considerable task to
transcribe and process this information.

      The task is considerably simplified in the arrangement
described here using a device that attaches to the telephone
network.  The device contains a processor incorporating speech
recognition software.  The software uses a specially designed
vocabulary with common surnames and location names.  The system is
also 'trained' to recognize human speech characteristic of telephone
transmission.  Further, software is incorporated that controls
recorded instructions to the service user to respond to specific
questions appropriate to the service provided.  This will include
requests to 'spell out' names and other information where recognition
is difficult.  The system will 'read back' at set points and ask the
service user to confirm accuracy of the recorded information (e.g.,
enter '1' to  confirm, '2' to retry on the touch tone key pad).  The
device incorporates a printer and creates a datafile of each caller's
responses for direct input into an associated computer system (for
processing orders, for example).  A summary of each call is printed
by the device (e.g., time of call, name, address, and telephone
number of caller).  Co...