Browse Prior Art Database

Two-Step Fusing Process and Accessory for Laser Printers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118843D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 219K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pohl, DW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The adhesion of toner to the output of laser printers with hot roll fusers can be improved by an auxiliary 'laser polishing' processing step. This reduces the development of debris in the post-printing processes such as cutting, folding, and sorting of printed material, which in turn allows for increased operating time without interruption.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Two-Step Fusing Process and Accessory for Laser Printers

      The adhesion of toner to the output of laser printers with hot
roll fusers can be improved by an auxiliary 'laser polishing'
processing step.  This reduces the development of debris in the
post-printing processes such as cutting, folding, and sorting of
printed material, which in turn allows for increased operating time
without interruption.

      High-end printers process large volumes of printed messages,
for instance, letters, at high speed.  Postprocessing
machines('mailers') cut, fold, and sort these letters and put them
into envelopes at a similarly fast rate.  Toner debris deposition on
the way through the mailer necessitates periodic interruptions (up to
several times per day)  for cleaning purposes, which typically
require 15 to 20 minutes each time.  The efficiency of a printing
center, hence, can be improved by reduction of debris deposition,
i.e., increased stability and adhesion  of the toner material
attached to the paper during the printing process.

      The sticking of the toner particles used in laser printers to
the fibers of the paper can be improved by increased heating of the
hot roll fuser (1,2), but only as long as the paper essentially
retains its  natural humidity.  The usual operating conditions,
therefore, are a compromise between these two contradicting
requirements, resulting in printed characters which are made up of
sintered rather than fused toner  particles.  The top layer of these
particles is readily scraped off during the sliding motion of the
letters through the mailer machine.

      The present invention builds on the observation that the
surface of hot roll printed characters can be perfectly f...