Browse Prior Art Database

Identifying and Optimizing PostScript Variable Data

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118901D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Duvall, KE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In large-scale data processing environments, a common requirement is that of the merge of variable customer data (such as names and addresses) with fixed form data (such as letters) to create personalized printed output. In the Local Area Network (LAN)/Workstation based segment of this environment, applications such as Quark Express or Microsoft Word* provide direct support for this capability using text, image, and graphics, as well as advanced database technology. These applications produce industry standard PostScript** output that conforms to Adobe's Document Structuring Conventions (DSC) and consists of fully composed pages in which there are no distinctions between variable and fixed data.

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Identifying and Optimizing PostScript Variable Data

      In large-scale data processing environments, a common
requirement is that of the merge of variable customer data (such as
names and addresses) with fixed form data (such as letters) to create
personalized printed output.  In the Local Area Network
(LAN)/Workstation based segment of this environment, applications
such as Quark Express or  Microsoft Word* provide direct support for
this capability using text,  image, and graphics, as well as advanced
database technology.  These applications produce industry standard
PostScript** output that conforms  to Adobe's Document Structuring
Conventions (DSC) and consists of fully  composed pages in which
there are no distinctions between variable and  fixed data.  Because
each page must be processed independently and completely, this type
of output is not optimized for printing on high speed printers, such
as the IBM*** 3170.

      A method for converting fully composed DSC PostScript page data
into optimized PostScript using the PostScript Level II "execform"
operator for fixed data resolves this problem for the aforementioned
high performance printer class (100 images per minute and beyond).
The execform operator yields a significant improvement in performance
because the fixed form data needs to be Raster Image Processed
(RIP'd) at most  one time for an entire job, as opposed to once per
page.  This technique  yields much higher printer throughput
capability, in particular for pages  containing complex images,
graphics, and/or color.  It als...