Browse Prior Art Database

Proactive Universal Resource Locators Lookup in Internet Web Browsers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118935D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fitzpatrick, GP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a feature of web browsers wherein, while the user is reading a web page (and the computer's CPU is typically inactive), the idle time is utilized by checking the web site Universal Resource Locators (URLs) listed on the current web site to see if the user would encounter any problems if any of these links were followed.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Proactive Universal Resource Locators Lookup in Internet Web Browsers

      Disclosed is a feature of web browsers wherein, while the user
is reading a web page (and the computer's CPU is typically inactive),
the idle time is utilized by checking the web site Universal Resource
Locators (URLs) listed on the current web site to see if the user
would encounter any problems if any of these links were followed.

      Users of Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) such as OS/2* and
Windows 95** are accustomed to browsing the World Wide Web (WWW) part
of the Internet using browsers such as Microsoft's Windows 95
Internet Explorer 3.0**.  Typically, a user will elect to follow a
'link' on a web  page.  Sometimes, the user will have to wait several
minutes for the new  page to display, only to be told it is
unavailable for some reason.

      Utilizing this approach, if the program finds a problem with
any address, the browser would provide appropriate feedback to the
user.  For instance, typically text links are presented to the user
in a user-controlled color (usually blue, by default).  With this
approach, if an address would not be available to the user, the color
feedback would change.  Here is an example of how the feedback would
change for two typical types of unavailability:

Address no longer valid

      URLs are 'hard-coded' in an HTML document.  The server address
the URL points to can become obsolete over time -- for instance, the
site pointed to mig...