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NiFe Plating with Reduced Cracking and Underplating of Photoresist Defined Patterns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118953D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Armstrong, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for plating NiFe which reduces the likelihood of resist failure when NiFe is plated into resist defined features. The deposition of high iron containing NiFe alloys with the constant current process used commonly for permalloy deposition causes enough stress upon the bordering resist pattern that cracking and underplating of the resist occurs. Pulse plating of the NiFe alloy prevents this stress from building to the point at which resist failure occurs. This method works by depositing the material in a thin layer and then interrupting current to relieve stress and to dissolve hydrogen from the film and interface into the bulk plating solution.

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NiFe Plating with Reduced Cracking and Underplating of Photoresist
Defined Patterns

      Disclosed is a process for plating NiFe which reduces the
likelihood of resist failure when NiFe is plated into resist defined
features.  The deposition of high iron containing NiFe alloys with
the constant current process used commonly for permalloy deposition
causes enough stress upon the bordering resist pattern that cracking
and underplating of the resist occurs.  Pulse plating of the NiFe
alloy prevents this stress from building to the point at which resist
failure occurs.  This method works by depositing the material in a
thin layer and then interrupting current to relieve stress and to
dissolve hydrogen from the film and interface into the bulk plating
solution.

      High iron NiFe alloys have been pulse plated into resist
frame defined features for the production of thin-film magnetic
transducers.  The device wafers were coated with 2.5 to 7 microns of
positive and negative tone resists to define the features.
Typically, 3 microns of material was plated although as much as 5
microns was used.  Pulse frequencies from 0.005 to 50 Hz, duty cycles
of 50 to 67%,  and peak current densities from 5.5 to 11 mA/cm(2)
were used.  The current wave form was a square wave where current was
stepped to the peak current for the duration of the on pulse and then
to zero for the  duration of the off pulse.

      Alternatives to the off period which allow for a period of
re...