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Message Processing Using Multiple Processors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000118992D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anthias, T: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Multiple processors are now extensively configured as clusters or parallel processors to provide enhanced throughput and reliability. The described technique allows effective exploitation of clusters and parallel processors for message processing by using multiple processors to process data in a single image of a queue in a shared nothing scheme. This results in higher throughput and higher availability than can be achieved with a single instance of a queue on a single processor.

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Message Processing Using Multiple Processors

      Multiple processors are now extensively configured as
clusters or parallel processors to provide enhanced throughput and
reliability.  The described technique allows effective exploitation
of clusters and parallel processors for message processing by using
multiple processors to process data in a single image of a queue in a
shared nothing scheme.  This results in higher throughput and higher
availability than can be achieved with a single instance of a queue
on a single processor.

      A queue is used to store data or work items to be processed in
the future.  The queue name uniquely defines the queue and so it is
normally an error to define the same queue twice.  The improved
technique allows multiple instances of the same queue to be defined
within a cluster of processors.  Queues with the same name are
equivalent and so  multiple systems can share in their processing.

      System software ensures that at least one queue with the name
requested by the application exists within the cluster when it is
opened.  The system software, having accepted the message, decides
which instance of the queue should hold it based on any algorithm it
likes.  The acts of "putting" (giving the message to the system),
choosing the instance of the queue, and processing the message are
not associated with a point in time.

      This scheme is largely contention free in that the processors
of the instances of the qu...