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Method for Automatically Selecting Correct BIOS Code to Support Network Initial Program Load from Remote Systems that Use Different Network Protocols

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119023D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Freeman, JW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Beginning with the Annihilator System (6272), IBM* Client System's commercial systems have supported two distinctly different methods of performing a remote bootstrap load from a server system that is connected to the client by way of a network link.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Method for Automatically Selecting Correct BIOS Code to Support Network
Initial Program Load from Remote Systems that Use Different Network
Protocols

      Beginning with the Annihilator System (6272), IBM* Client
System's commercial systems have supported two distinctly different
methods of performing a remote bootstrap load from a server system
that is connected to the client by way of a network link.

These two methods are:
  1.  Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) and
  2.  Remote Initial Program Load (RIPL).

      Because of differences in the network protocols used by the two
schemes, there are separate code modules provided to perform the
initial request to the remote server system.  To select which code
module is used, it is necessary for the end user to go into the BIOS
setup program  and select either RIPL or DHCP as the protocol that
they wish to use for  booting from a network server.

      If a large number of machines are being installed, this extra
step of having to go into the setup program and make a selection can
add a significant amount of time to the process and introduces the
opportunity for operator induced errors.  This is not in keeping with
the divisional "Promise of Value" that our products will provide the
lowest total cost of ownership to our customers.

      This invention provides a technique to allow a network-attached
Personal Computer to automatically determine which type of server is
present on the network and correctly set the default choice of DHCP
or RIPL protocols to be used for remote bootstrap load.

The implementation is as follows:
  1.  A flag is set in non-volatile memory during the last step
       of manufacturing that has the meaning "No network boot
       protocol selected".  (This bit should be 'on' when the
       customer receives the system.)
  2.  Sequence of events:
      a.  System is connected to AC power and network c...