Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Showing a Ratio whose Change is Correlated with Time

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119085D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 4 page(s) / 114K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ando, F: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for displaying a continuously changing ratio. The format of analogue clocks, in which a complete circle represents twelve hours, one hour, or one minute, is familiar to people as a way of showing time. The disclosed method uses this format to represent a ratio whose change is correlated with the passage of time, indicating the ratio by a hand of a clock, as in Fig. 1.

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Method for Showing a Ratio whose Change is Correlated with Time

      Disclosed is a method for displaying a continuously changing
ratio.  The format of analogue clocks, in which a complete circle
represents twelve hours, one hour, or one minute, is familiar to
people as a way of showing time.  The disclosed method uses this
format to represent a ratio whose change is correlated with the
passage of time,  indicating the ratio by a hand of a clock, as in
Fig. 1.

      The display consists of three elements: a circle, a hand, and
sectors of the circle, as in Fig. 2.  The central angle, C, and
length, Li, of a sector are given by the following equations:
  C = 2 * pi * Ts / T
  Li = R * Pi where pi is the circular constant, T is the time
represented by a complete circle, Ts is the sampling interval, R is
the radius of the circle, Pi is the proportion represented by the
area Ai, and sum (Pi:  i = 1...n) = 1.  In this case, the proportion
of the area Ai to the whole sector is not equal to Pi.  However, it
is equal to Pi if the length Li is determined by the following
equation instead of the one above:
  Li = R * (root(sum(Pj: j = 1...i)) - root(sum(Pj: j = 1...i-1))).
In the disclosed method, sectors are painted after the hand,
displaying a continuously changing ratio.  As the hand moves around,
it paints over  the sectors.

      It is possible to draw lines instead of painting sectors, as in
Fig. 3.  It is also possible to draw or paint on a spiral in...