Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Graphical Display of Objects for OS/2

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119104D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eisenberger, G: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a tool to assist Information Technology (IT) Architects in designing IT infrastructures. This tool was developed using the OS/2* Workplace Shell* (WPS). Since the Workplace Shell is used, all objects in the design are desktop objects. Desktop objects are objects that appear either directly on the OS/2 desktop or in folders within the desktop environment. Desktop objects can include datafiles, folders (file system directories), programs and other objects. In the PlanAhead tool, we primarily used WPS folders to represent objects in a design (for example: Databases, Processes, Users, Computers, etc.).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Graphical Display of Objects for OS/2

      Disclosed is a tool to assist Information Technology (IT)
Architects in designing IT infrastructures.  This tool was developed
using the OS/2* Workplace Shell* (WPS).  Since the Workplace Shell is
used, all objects in the design are desktop objects.  Desktop objects
are objects that appear either directly on the OS/2 desktop or in
folders within the desktop environment.  Desktop objects can include
datafiles, folders (file system directories), programs and other
objects.  In the  PlanAhead tool, we primarily used WPS folders to
represent objects in a  design (for example:  Databases, Processes,
Users, Computers, etc.).

      Because these objects were WPS folders, users could open them
in Icon View, Tree View, and Details View.  These are the standard
views of folders or containers used by OS/2 and Microsoft's Windows
operating systems.  For this tool, however, a view was needed that
conveyed to the user the relationship between two desktop objects.
For example, it was desirable to show that one computer is connected
to another or that one process is executed after another.
Furthermore, we  wanted to display all the objects in a folder in
graphical manner that  clearly showed the relationships between all
objects in the folder.

      To accomplish this graphical view, a new view for folders
called the "Graph View" was developed.  The Graph View is similar to
the icon view in that it represents objects in...