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Method and Apparatus of Integrating a Personal Computer, Televisions, and Telephones into a Low-Cost Home Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119124D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mastro, MP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a low-cost method and apparatus to solve the problem of inconvenient access to the Personal Computer (PC). A home network (36) (shown in the Figure) consists of a PC (2), a phone-line switch (4), a telephone (8), a wireless pointing device (26), a Television (TV) (16), a pair of TV signal transmitter (10) and receiver (12), a pair of audio signal transmitter (28) and receiver (30), a speaker (34), control signal transceivers (18) and (20), and a home appliance (22). The key features of this network are incoming message alert, remote access to the PC (2) with the telephone (8), and web surfing and Compact Disk-Read Only Memory (CD-ROM) game playing on a TV (10).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 54% of the total text.

Method and Apparatus of Integrating a Personal Computer, Televisions,
and Telephones into a Low-Cost Home Network

      Disclosed is a low-cost method and apparatus to solve the
problem of inconvenient access to the Personal Computer (PC).  A home
network (36) (shown in the Figure) consists of a PC (2), a phone-line
switch (4), a telephone (8), a wireless pointing device (26), a
Television (TV) (16), a pair of TV signal transmitter (10) and
receiver (12), a pair of audio signal transmitter (28) and receiver
(30), a speaker (34), control signal transceivers (18) and (20), and
a home appliance (22).  The key features of this network are incoming
message alert, remote access to the PC (2) with the telephone (8),
and web surfing and Compact Disk-Read Only Memory (CD-ROM) game
playing on a TV  (10).

      There are two methods to implement the incoming message
alert.  The first one uses the speaker (34); once the PC (2) receives
a voice message or an e-mail, it drives the audio signal transmitter
(28) to send a voice signal to the receiver (30) through wires or via
radio frequencies.  The speaker (34) can then announce the type of
message and name of the person who should receive it.  The second
method uses different ring patterns to identify different messages.
For instance,  one ring represents an incoming e-mail for person A
and two rings indicates an incoming e-mail for person B.  The
different ring patterns  can be generated by activating the
phone-line sw...