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Navigation Between Graphical Objects by Simulating Tabs with Time Delay

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119164D
Original Publication Date: 1997-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 67K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

James, D: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for simulating tabs using a time delay mechanism for navigating between graphical objects that are spread out with a pointing device such as a trackpoint. In this technique, the currently selected object is highlighted and the cursor is clipped to the center of the object. When enough push or movement is given to the pointing device, the cursor then tabs to the next object in sequence and stays there for a predetermined amount of time before accepting any further movements from the pointing device. This enables stopping at each object and prevents overshooting. This method is particularly useful while traversing vertical list of menu items using a track point.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Navigation Between Graphical Objects by Simulating Tabs with Time
Delay

      Disclosed is a method for simulating tabs using a time delay
mechanism for navigating between graphical objects that are spread
out with a pointing device such as a trackpoint.  In this technique,
the currently selected object is highlighted and the cursor is
clipped to the center of the object.  When enough push or movement is
given to the pointing device, the cursor then tabs to the next object
in sequence and stays there for a predetermined amount of time before
accepting any further movements from the pointing device.  This
enables stopping at each object and prevents overshooting.  This
method is particularly useful while traversing vertical list of menu
items using a track point.

      The graphical objects presented on a screen in a data
processing system (menus, drop-down lists) are navigated using
pointing device such as a mouse.  The objects are selected in
response to the movement of the pointing device.  Because of the
dynamic nature of the  pointing device, it is not easy to stop
precisely at a given object.  This is especially true for objects
that are spread apart with  the cursor clipped to the object, such
menu items, etc.  With a large movement, it is difficult sometimes to
stop precisely at the objects in  the middle.  Clipping the pointing
device to an object until a sufficient  movement occurs really helps
but still makes it difficult to stop at objects in the middle.

      The solution is to force the user to stay on an object for a
short period of time before responding to further mouse movements.

      In response to the movement of the pointing device, the next
object is selected and the cursor is clipped to the object.  From
that point in time, mouse movements are ignored for a fraction of a
second (say half a second).  This causes the cursor to stay on the
object for  the time period before moving to the next one in response
to the mouse ...