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Integrated Data Object Content Architecture Description

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119239D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 3 page(s) / 118K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonsall, GW: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Two distinct document processing environments may be identified within computer systems; they are the presentation environment and the interchange environment. Each of these environments has a unique set of document structuring requirements associated with it. In the presentation environment the document is exhibited in human recognizable form on a specific computer resource, such as a display, a printer, or a plotter, using the specific functions of the resource. In the interchange environment, the document is moved from one computer resource to another with a minimum knowledge required of the function supported by the target resource.

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Integrated Data Object Content Architecture Description

      Two distinct document processing environments may be
identified within computer systems; they are the presentation
environment and the interchange environment. Each of these
environments has a unique set of document structuring requirements
associated with it. In the presentation environment the document is
exhibited in human recognizable form on a specific computer resource,
such as a display, a printer, or a plotter, using the specific
functions of the resource. In the interchange environment, the
document is moved from one computer resource to another with a
minimum knowledge required of the function supported by the target
resource.

      Data streams are defined to support specification of document
structuring requirements of these related environments. Typically,
there is a single data stream for the presentation environment, and
one for the interchange environment. Each of these data streams is
governed by separate architected definition. These data streams
account for the differences in environment through unique structures
and controls. An example of an interchange data stream is the Office
Document Architecture (ODA), an International Standard for
interchanging document descriptions. An example of a presentation
data stream is Standard Page Description Language (SPDL), an
International Standard proposal for document presentation
description.

      The contents of a document may be ordered into groups or blocks
called objects. For example, the heading, body, and footnotes may all
be considered objects of the document. Subsequently, the body object
may be subdivided into paragraphs, each of which is an object. A
business graph or picture may each be considered to be objects. The
representation of the content of these objects is typically grouped
by the type of data represented in the object (text, image, graphics,
etc.). Each of these groupings may be called an object type. The
description of each object type is covered by a separate architected
definition. The objects become elements of the data streams mentioned
above. Examples of these object content architectures are the Content
Architecture definitions for text, image and graphics supported by
the ODA International Standard.

      Therefore, in any given environment, the data stream
description will contain one or more object descriptions for
particular object types. Since the contents of the document
description are provided in separate, data type-dependent
description, a complex picture containing elements from two or more
of these data types, must rely on the data stream definition to
define the relationships of the various elements. For example, a
complex picture containing a business graph, an image of the company
logo, and a textual description is made up of four separate elements;
a graphics definition of the business graph (which may con...