Browse Prior Art Database

Low-Cost Kanji Data Entry System Using Invisible UPC Codes

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119248D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ouchi, NK: AUTHOR

Abstract

Kanji character data entry usually requires a complex keyboard because of the large number of different ideograms. Disclosed is the use of standard IBM PC keyboard and system unit with a UPC reader. Ideograms are selected from a hard copy vocabulary using a hand-held UPC reader. The vocabulary of ideograms is printed with visible characters that are over printed with corresponding invisible UPC codes.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

Low-Cost Kanji Data Entry System Using Invisible UPC Codes

      Kanji character data entry usually requires a complex
keyboard because of the large number of different ideograms.
Disclosed is the use of standard IBM PC keyboard and system unit with
a UPC reader.  Ideograms are selected from a hard copy vocabulary
using a hand-held UPC reader.  The vocabulary of ideograms is printed
with visible characters that are over printed with corresponding
invisible UPC codes.

      Kanji is a complex character structure used in Japan and China.
The Chinese telegraph code assigns 10,000 Arabic numerals to a
character vocabulary that includes all those in common usage.  A six
thousand-character vocabulary is considered acceptable for most text
processing, but the language contains substantially more characters.
Most data entry systems have developed a complex keyboard that
require multi-key entry per character or a phonetic system that
requires human interpretation to resolve homonyms. Disclosed is a
system that uses a lexicographically ordered vocabulary with a
corresponding UPC code for each.  To make the tables compact, the UPC
codes are printed in ultraviolet or infrared ink over the characters
and the UPC reader is designed to read the invisible code.  Thus, six
thousand ideograms can be contained in six 8 1/2" by 11" pages and an
augmented dictionary of 16 pages can contain 16,000 additional
ideograms.  Tables with visible UPC codes can be constructed and
would be...