Browse Prior Art Database

Low-Cost Kanji Data Entry System Using Screen Entry

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119250D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ouchi, NK: AUTHOR

Abstract

Kanji is a complex ideogram vocabulary used as the written language in Japan and China. Approximately six thousand Kanji characters are sufficient for most text applications, but sixteen thousand characters would be necessary for scholarly work. Most Kanji or ideogram text entry/editor systems require additional hardware, such as a complex keyboard. Disclosed is an entry/edit system for a standard IBM PC or PS/2*. Character entry is through selection from the display using the cursor keys, a mouse or light pen. Since the vocabulary cannot be contained in a single panel, the ideograms are lexicographically divided into panels and the individual panels are selected using a tree structure. The display is divided into two windows: text and entry. Each window has its own cursor.

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Low-Cost Kanji Data Entry System Using Screen Entry

      Kanji is a complex ideogram vocabulary used as the
written language in

Japan

and

China

.  Approximately six thousand
Kanji characters are sufficient for most text applications, but
sixteen thousand characters would be necessary for scholarly work.
Most Kanji or ideogram text entry/editor systems require additional
hardware, such as a complex keyboard.  Disclosed is an entry/edit
system for a standard IBM PC or PS/2*.  Character entry is through
selection from the display using the cursor keys, a mouse or light
pen. Since the vocabulary cannot be contained in a single panel, the
ideograms are lexicographically divided into panels and the
individual panels are selected using a tree structure. The display is
divided into two windows: text and entry. Each window has its own
cursor.  In the text window, the most recent line of text is
displayed.  In the entry window, approximately 250 ideograms are
displayed.  A characters is entered by selecting one using the
cursor, mouse, or light pen from the entry window.  The selected
character appears in the text window at the text window cursor.

      However, the number of interesting ideograms is greater than
250 so the entry panel must easily selectable.  The top line of the
entry area has a line of ideograms that lexicographically break the
vocabulary into panel size units.  Each ideogram serves as the key
for its panel. However, a sixteen thousand-ideogram vocabulary would
require 64 panels and require 64 ideograms on the selection line.
This would consume several useable lines in the entry area.  The
disclosed structure arranges the panels into N groups where N
ideograms fit on the selection line.  When a group is selected, the
entry panel displays the 250 commonly used ideograms in that group
and a line of ideograms for fu...