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Lift-Off Patterning of Metal Films With Metallo-Organic Ink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119337D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a technique that allows for optical patterning of "spin on" metallo-organic inks utilizing a lift-off process. In prior art (1,2) a method is taught to pattern metal films using a laser to locally decompose a metal resinate ink, or chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of films using corrosive gases and a gas cell. The concept described herein improves on the prior art by using standard semiconductor processing, optical patterning, and lift-off techniques to achieve metal film patterns.

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Lift-Off Patterning of Metal Films With Metallo-Organic Ink

      Disclosed is a technique that allows for optical
patterning of  "spin on" metallo-organic inks utilizing a lift-off
process.  In prior art (1,2) a method is taught to pattern metal
films using a laser to locally decompose a metal resinate ink, or
chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of films using  corrosive gases and a
gas cell.  The concept described herein improves on the prior art by
using standard semiconductor processing, optical patterning, and
lift-off techniques to achieve metal film patterns.

      A novolac-based photoresist, for example, AZ 1400* series, is
spin coated onto quartz, pyrex, sapphire or silicon substrates,
exposed and developed to provide a positive photoresist stencil.  The
novolac-based resist is then silylated using standard silylation bath
techniques (3).  A metallo-organic ink, such as Bright Gold NE** (18%
by weight Gold), is then spin coated onto the silylated photoresist
pattern, baked at 90oC for 10 minutes in air to drive off solvents,
and then fired in a furnace at 550oC for approximately 15 minutes.
The ink, when raised to this temperature decomposes, leaving behind a
gold film, and the silylated resist pattern, which is easily removed
in an aqueous base solution, such as KOH, leaving behind a patterned
gold film.  This is an unexpected result in that it is well known
that novolac-based resists, optical, electron-beam, etc., become
extremely difficult to strip when exposed to elevated temp...