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Laser Printhead for Single Cycle Color Electrophotographic Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119393D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Prakash, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Using a single polygon mirror and a single set of scan optics, a laser printhead design is proposed that permits synchronized writing on the photoconductor at several locations. These locations are separated by tenths of centimeters to get different color developers between the exposure stations. The scanning beams maintain scan position synchronization at these locations.

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Laser Printhead for Single Cycle Color Electrophotographic Printer

      Using a single polygon mirror and a single set of scan
optics, a laser printhead design is proposed that permits
synchronized writing on the photoconductor at several locations.
These locations are separated by tenths of centimeters to get
different color developers between the exposure stations.  The
scanning beams maintain scan position synchronization at these
locations.

      The aperture imaging scheme [*] allows one to image apertures
onto the photoconductor.  The imaged spots have relative geometry
same as the apertures with a scaling factor equal to the optical
magnification of the system.  In this manner, a single scan
(corresponding to a polygon facet) could paint multiple lines on the
photoconductor and maintain the relative spacing of the painted
lines.  Note that the beams leaving the apertures are collimated and
parallel to each other.

      In the proposed system, the beams leaving the apertures, though
still collimated, have a small relative angle (few minutes of arc)
with respect to each other. Combined with the fact that the beams are
small in size in the process direction, they separate (physically) as
they leave the second field lens (see the figure).

      Using front surface mirrors, the exiting beams are reflected to
go to different regions of the photoconductor. The final field lens
(plastic aspheric lens) is introduced in the optical path of each of
these...